July:

July 21

We Are Water MN” is a Minnesota Humanities Center program that uses the humanities to deepen connections between and among Minnesotans and the water we all rely on, through a network of partnerships, a traveling exhibit, and public events. Each year, five host sites are selected to display the exhibit and engage community members with its content and one another over an eight-week period.

July 29, August 26, September 30, October 28, November 25, December 23

The PFund Foundation offers event sponsorships for events, gatherings, conferences, and convenings serving a primarily LGBTQ+ audience. Sponsorship amounts typically range from $500 - $1,000 and organizations are limited to receiving one sponsorship per calendar year. Applications are reviewed on the last Monday of each month. After grants are reviewed, payment processing takes about 4 weeks. Please make sure to apply at least 60-days before your event date. 

August:

August 5

This grant supports organizations which are providing direct resources and services to start and expand business opportunities within diverse and/or traditionally underserved populations in southern Minnesota. SMIF seeks applications which foster communities to build inclusive, welcoming entrepreneurial environments to advance equitable entrepreneurship opportunities in the lives of all people. 

August 14

The Public Humanities Projects program supports projects that bring the ideas of the humanities to life for general audiences through public programming.  Projects must engage humanities scholarship to analyze significant themes in disciplines such as history, literature, ethics, and art history. Awards support projects that are intended to reach broad and diverse public audiences in non-classroom settings in the United States. Projects should engage with ideas that are accessible to the general public and employ appealing interpretive formats.

August 14

The Media Projects program supports the development, production, and distribution of radio programs, podcasts, documentary films, and documentary film series  that engage general audiences with humanities ideas in creative and appealing ways. Projects must be grounded in humanities scholarship and demonstrate an approach that is thoughtful, balanced, and analytical. Media Projects offers two levels of funding: Development and Production.  

August 15

Our Town is the NEA’s creative placemaking grants program. Through project-based funding, the program supports activities that integrate arts, culture, and design into local efforts that strengthen communities over the long term. Our Town projects engage a wide range of local stakeholders in efforts to advance local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes in communities. Competitive projects are responsive to unique local conditions, develop meaningful and substantive engagement in communities, center equity, advance artful lives, and lay the groundwork for long-term systems change.

August 20

Funded through the Historic Preservation Fund, the History of Equal Rights grant program preserves sites related to the struggle for any or all people to achieve equal rights in America. The History of Equal Rights grants are not limited to any specific group and are intended to include the broadest possible interpretation of sites associated with efforts to achieve equal rights. This program funds physical preservation work and pre-preservation planning activities for sites that are listed in or determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places or as a National Historic Landmark. Should a site not be listed, or not listed for its association with equal rights, then a new nomination or amendment must be created as part of the grant project.

September:

September 1

Grants for public programs and community projects are awarded to nonprofit (501(c)3) organizations. These grants encourage the perpetuation of Scandinavian cultural traditions through the support of community events such as festivals, celebrations, and heritage events as well as workshops, performances, classes, and demonstrations. Grants for public programs and community projects range from $5,000 to $50,000. 

September 1

The Lois Lenski Covey Foundation awards grants to organizations that operate a lending bookmobile that travels into neighborhoods populated by underserved youth. The grants are for purchasing books published for young people preschool through grade 8. Bookmobiles operated by charitable [501(c)(3)] and other non-taxable agencies, including public libraries or schools, are eligible. The Foundation provides grants to organizations that serve economically or socially at-risk children, have limited book budgets, and demonstrate real need. Grants range from $500 to $3000 and are specifically for book purchases, and cannot be used for administrative or operational uses

September 5th

The African American Civil Rights (AACR) documents, interprets, and preserves sites and stories related to the African American struggle to gain equal rights as citizens. The 2008 NPS report Civil Rights in America, A Framework for Identifying Significant Sites serves as the foundation reference document for the grant program and for grant applicants to use in determining the appropriateness of proposed projects and properties. The grants are funded by the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) and administered by the NPS. This competitive grant program provides grants to states, tribes, local governments (including Certified Local Governments), and nonprofits. Non-federal matching share is not required, but preference will be given to applications that show community commitment through non-federal match and partnership collaboration. Grants will fund a broad range of planning, development, and research projects for historic sites including: survey, inventory, documentation, interpretation, education, architectural services, historic structure reports, preservation plans, and "bricks and mortar" repair.

September 17

The Dialogues on the Experience of War program supports the development of humanities-focused discussion programs that enlarge the understanding of the meaning and experiences of military service and war. Through the training of facilitators for and the offering of these discussion programs, Dialogues projects enable veterans and nonveterans to explore together and in depth such topics as civic engagement, veteran identity, legacies of military service, the human costs of war, and homecoming. This engagement in reflective and recursive discussions fosters intellectual community and social connections among the participants in Dialogues projects. Project teams should include humanities scholars, military veterans, and individuals with relevant experience.

September 18

As energy costs rise and natural disasters become more frequent, humanities organizations - such as museums, libraries, archives, historic sites, and colleges and universities - face an enormous task: to anticipate operational, physical, and financial impacts of climate-related events on their institutions, while also reducing their own impact on the environment. Climate Smart Humanities Organizations supports these efforts by offering federal matching funds for comprehensive organizational assessments that lead to strategic climate action and adaptation plans.  

September 30

T-Mobile Hometown Grants is a $25 million, five-year initiative to support the people and organizations who help small towns across America thrive and grow. Hometown Grants are given every quarter to up to 25 small towns. Elected officials, town managers/employees, tribal leaders, and nonprofit community leaders from town with a population less than 50,000 can apply for up to $50,000 in funding to support a community project of your choice, like revitalizing or repurposing a historic structure, creating a downtown asset or destination, or improving a space where friends and neighbors gather. Projects that add to a sense of place or could lead to further investment are of particular interest.

More Info Coming Summer 2024

The Blandin Foundation funds rural Minnesota leaders thinking and acting courageously with partners on a vision that their community stands behind. They focus on funding and programming to support sustainable strategies that produce measurable outcomes in their 3 impact areas (community wealth-building, rural placemaking and small communities). 

October:

October 15

Grants of $1500 are intended to assist the costume and textiles collection of a college or university that receives little or no financial support from its institution. Funding may be used to support the care, conservation, and/or instructional mission of a collection of historic, period, or otherwise informative costume and textiles that are intended for preservation and are used for study by an institution that has a degree program in apparel, textiles, or theatre.

October 15

Grants of $1,500 are intended to assist the costume and textiles collection of a small museum (including historical societies, historic houses or sites, and other similar institutions) that has a very limited budget and staff. Funding may be used to support the care, conservation, and/or exhibition of costume and textiles that have historic, regional, or other significance and are intended for preservation.

October 31

The DAR Historic Preservation Grants provide financial assistance for projects that preserve historic objects and sites. Examples include restoration of historic buildings; digitization or preservation of documents/records; preservation of historic items/artifacts; restoration, rededication or relocation of existing historical site markers; cemetery headstone and monument conservation.  Projects from all eras and chapters of American history are eligible to apply. The maximum grant is $10,000, and smaller projects are encouraged. Please note that each application must be accompanied by letter from a sponsoring DAR chapter or state organization (find a local DAR chapter here).

November:

November 1

The Site Preservation Grant is intended to fund projects that uphold the AIA’s mission to preserve and protect the world’s archaeological heritage for future generations. The goal of the grant, which carries a maximum award of $15,000, is to enhance global preservation efforts and promote awareness of the need to protect threatened archaeological sites. The AIA seeks to support projects that not only directly preserve archaeological sites, but those that also include public outreach and education components that create a positive impact on the local community, students, and the discipline of archaeology as a whole.

November 15

Inspire! Grants for Small Museums is a special initiative offered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services through the Museums for America program. It is designed to support small museums of all disciplines in project-based efforts to serve the public through exhibitions, educational/interpretive programs, digital learning resources, policy development and institutional planning, technology enhancements, professional development, community outreach, audience development, and/or collections management, curation, care, and conservation. 

November 15

Inspire! Grants for Small Museums is a special initiative offered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services through the Museums for America program. It is designed to support projects that use the transformative power of professional development and training to generate systemic change within museums of all types and sizes.

November 15

Inspire! Grants for Small Museums is a special initiative offered by the Institute for Museum and Library Services through the Museums for America program. It is designed to support small museums of all disciplines in project-based efforts to serve the public through exhibitions, educational/interpretive programs, digital learning resources, policy development and institutional planning, technology enhancements, professional development, community outreach, audience development, and/or collections management, curation, care, and conservation. 

Rolling Deadline:

This program provides affordable funding to develop essential community facilities in rural areas, including libraries and museums. An essential community facility is defined as a facility that provides an essential service to the local community for the orderly development of the community in a primarily rural area, and does not include private, commercial or business undertakings. 

The mission of the Jan Stauber Grants is to provide needed financial assistance to persons and organizations developing literacy programs and other educational experiences that will introduce young people to Sherlock Holmes. Applications can be submitted at any time, and libraries can be awarded up to $1,000 for a project.

Funded by the Minnesota Department of Health and carried out by the St. Paul Conservatory of Music, this program aims to improve student social-emotional health, enhance musical arts awareness, improve engagement in school, and increase community vitality through music.  Students involved in the program will have an opportunity to engage in artistically excellent individual and group music instruction from St. Paul Conservatory of Music faculty

The Pomeroy Foundation is interested in a wide range of initiatives that help communities across the country celebrate their history and cultural heritage. Requests for Special Interest Grants can include professional development for small history organizations, technology upgrades for small history organizations, celebrations of significant national milestones in American history, digitization of materials that stabilize collections and increase public access, and more.

The Rural Technology Fund provides grants for Rural Technology Education projects and Assistive Technology projects. If you are interested in applying for funding to support your project, please review the grant types at the link below and be sure you submit to the correct application. Applications are reviewed and grants are awarded every 30-60 days, and there are no specific deadlines for applying. Grant are  available to school and organizations operating in the United States.

This grant program is divided into two parts
  • One for preservation projects (for properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places for national significance or designated a National Historic Landmark. The property may be listed on either individually or as contributing to a nationally significant district). These awards are managed by the National Park Service.
  • One for projects involving collections (including artifacts, museum collections, documents, sculptures, and other works of art). These awards are managed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.